epiH Search

CLOSE



Brief Communication

August 3, 2021


Cancer incidence in the Tobruk area, eastern Libya: first results from Tobruk Medical Centre
Faisal Ismail, Ahmed G. Elsayed, Islam El-Garawani, Eman Abdelsameea
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021050.

Original Article

August 3, 2021


Association between a family history of diabetes and carotid artery atherosclerosis in Korean adults
Sun Young Shim, Ga Bin Lee, Jee-Seon Shim, Sun Jae Jung, Hyeon Chang Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021049.

Original Article

August 3, 2021


Effect of tobacco outlet density on quit attempts in Korea: a multi-level analysis of the 2015 Korean Community Health Survey
Jaehyung Kong, Sung-il Cho
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021048.

Original Article

July 13, 2021


Preventable causes of cancer in Texas by race/ethnicity: tobacco smoking
Franciska J. Gudenkauf, Aaron P. Thrift
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021046.

Systematic Review

July 13, 2021


A closer look at the high burden of psychiatric disorders among healthcare workers in Egypt during the COVID-19 pandemic
Amr Ehab El-Qushayri, Abdullah Dahy, Abdullah Reda, Mariam Abdelmageed Mahmoud, Sarah Abdel Mageed, Ahmed Mostafa Ahmed Kamel, Sherief Ghozy
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021045.

Current Issue
Volume 43; 2021
Brief Communication Cancer incidence in the Tobruk area, eastern Libya: first results from Tobruk Medical Centre
Faisal Ismail, Ahmed G. Elsayed, Islam El-Garawani, Eman Abdelsameea Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021050.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Original Article Association between a family history of diabetes and carotid artery atherosclerosis in Korean adults
Sun Young Shim, Ga Bin Lee, Jee-Seon Shim, Sun Jae Jung, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021049.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and it is an increasing problem in developing countries. Estimation of the incidence of cancer is important, especially in regions with limited epidemiological data on cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide an updated report on the incidence of cancers in the Tobruk region in eastern Libya.
METHODS:
Data on cancer patients from the records of the Department of Histopathology of Tobruk Medical Centre from January 2013 to June 2020 were included.
RESULTS:
In total, 402 cases were recorded. Men patients accounted for 30.3% (n=122) of cases, and women patients represented 69.6% (n=280). The overall mean age at the time of the first diagnosis was 49.0±17.1 years. The most common malignancies were breast and uterine cancer in women (18.4%, n=74; 15.9%, n=64, respectively), colorectal cancer (11.6%, n=47; 26 in women and 21 in men), bladder cancer (8.2%, n=33; 8 in women and 25 in men), and thyroid cancer (8.0%, n=32; 23 in women and 9 in men).
CONCLUSIONS:
Breast and uterine cancers were the most common cancers in women, and bladder and colorectal cancer were the most common cancers in men, followed by colorectal cancer in both genders. These data will help health authorities launch preventive plans for cancer in the region. Further studies to identify aetiological factors and cancer-related risk factors need to be conducted in the region.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for atherosclerosis, but the association between a family history of diabetes and atherosclerosis remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the association between a family history of diabetes and increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, in a middle-aged Korean population.
METHODS:
This cross-sectional study included 3,974 community-dwelling adults (1,404 male and 2,570 female) aged 30-64 years from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center cohort. The presence of a family history of diabetes was assessed through face-to-face interviews using a standardized questionnaire. Carotid IMT was assessed using B-mode ultrasonography, and increased IMT was defined as a value in the top quartile of the IMT values of all participants. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate independent associations between a family history of diabetes and increased IMT.
RESULTS:
A family history of diabetes was significantly associated with increased carotid IMT (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.48) after adjusting for sex; age; body mass index; systolic blood pressure; total cholesterol, triglyceride, and hemoglobin A1c levels; smoking; alcohol consumption; exercise; use of antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and antilipidemic drugs; and a family history of hypertension. The positive association remained significant after excluding participants with diabetes (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.47).
CONCLUSIONS:
A family history of diabetes was positively associated with increased carotid IMT, even in participants without diabetes. Therefore, information on a family history of diabetes may help identify individuals at high risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Original Article Effect of tobacco outlet density on quit attempts in Korea: a multi-level analysis of the 2015 Korean Community Health Survey
Jaehyung Kong, Sung-il Cho Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021048.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
Original Article Preventable causes of cancer in Texas by race/ethnicity: tobacco smoking
Franciska J. Gudenkauf, Aaron P. Thrift Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021046.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed to examine whether the regional density of tobacco outlets in Korea was associated with the likelihood of attempting to quit among smokers
METHODS:
This study was designed as a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional study. Data from the 2015 Korean Community Health Survey and tobacco outlet registrations in 17 metropolitan cities and provinces with 254 communities in Korea were used for the analysis. In total, 41,013 current smokers (≥19 years of age) were included. Multi-level logistic regression analysis was conducted to investigate regional differences associated with smokers’ attempts to quit and to evaluate the effects of individual and regional characteristics on quit attempts.
RESULTS:
Higher tobacco outlet density was associated with lower odds of attempting to quit. Smokers who resided in districts with the highest tobacco outlet density were 18% less likely to attempt quitting (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 0.98) than smokers who resided in the regions with the lowest tobacco outlet density (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.030).
CONCLUSIONS:
This study showed that quit attempts were related to community-level factors, such as tobacco outlet density, as well as other individual factors. These findings support the implementation of national policies restricting the number of tobacco outlets within communities or zones and limiting tobacco marketing in tobacco outlets.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Tobacco smoking is classified as carcinogenic to humans (International Agency for Research on Cancer Group 1). We aimed to estimate the percentage and number of incident cancer cases diagnosed in Texas in 2015 that were attributable to tobacco smoking, and we examined differences in the proportions of smoking-attributable cancers between the major racial/ethnic subgroups of the population.
METHODS:
We calculated population-attributable fractions for cancers attributable to tobacco smoking using prevalence data from the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and relative risks associated with smoking status from pooled analyses of cohort studies or meta-analyses. Cancer incidence data were collected from the Texas Cancer Registry.
RESULTS:
We estimated that 19,000 excess cancer cases or 18.4% of all cancers diagnosed in 2015 in Texans aged ≥ 25 years were caused by tobacco smoking. Males had a higher overall proportion of cancers attributable to tobacco smoking than females (male, 23.3%, 11,993 excess cases; female, 13.5%, 7,006 cases). Approximately 20% of cancer cases in non-Hispanic Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks were attributable to tobacco smoking compared to 12.8% among Hispanics.
CONCLUSIONS:
Despite ongoing public health campaigns combatting tobacco use, this preventable behavior still contributes significantly to cancer incidence in Texas. Racial/ethnic differences in smoking prevalence and smoking-attributable cancer incidence should be considered when designing cancer prevention programs.
Systematic Review A closer look at the high burden of psychiatric disorders among healthcare workers in Egypt during the COVID-19 pandemic
Amr Ehab El-Qushayri, Abdullah Dahy, Abdullah Reda, Mariam Abdelmageed Mahmoud, et al. Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021045.
  • Abstract
  • View article
Original Article Exploring the associations between cardiovascular health measured with the CANHEART model and early cognitive impairment in a middle-aged population in Korea
Ye Jin Jeon, Ji Heon Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Sun Jae Jung Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021044.
  • Abstract
  • View article
  • Korean summary
  • Supplementary data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed to examine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among Egyptian healthcare workers (HCWs) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
METHODS:
Six databases were searched for relevant papers. The quality of the selected articles was measured using the National Institute of Health quality assessment tool. We used a fixed-effects model when there was no heterogeneity and a random-effects model when there was heterogeneity.
RESULTS:
After screening 197 records, 10 studies were ultimately included. Anxiety was the most commonly reported psychiatric disorder among HCWs, with a prevalence of 71.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49.4 to 86.9), followed by stress (66.6%; 95% CI, 47.6 to 81.3), depression (65.5%; 95% CI, 46.9 to 80.3), and insomnia (57.9%; 95% CI, 45.9 to 69.0). As measured using the 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, the most common level of severity was moderate for depression (22.5%; 95% CI, 19.8 to 25.5) and stress (14.5%; 95% CI, 8.8 to 22.9), while high-severity anxiety was more common than other levels of severity (28.2%; 95% CI, 3.8 to 79.6).
CONCLUSIONS:
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative effect on Egyptian HCWs’ psychological well-being. More psychological support and preventive measures should be implemented to prevent the further development of psychiatric illness among physicians and other HCWs.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Both cardiovascular health (CVH) and inflammation are associated with cognition, and inflammation is also associated with CVH. However, limited information has been reported on these factors in the Korean population. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of inflammation on the association between CVH and cognition using a cross-sectional design.
METHODS:
Data were obtained from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center baseline study. Participants who completed fasting serum analysis, questionnaires, and cognitive function tests were included in the analysis, whereas those with a history of autoimmune disease were excluded. The CVH in Ambulatory Care Research Team health index metrics, including smoking, physical activity, healthy diet, obesity, history of hypertension, and diabetes, were used to assess CVH. Cognitive function was evaluated with the Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Estimation for Dementia Screening. Inflammatory status was assessed based on a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) test.
RESULTS:
Among 2,622 total participants (mean age, 57.2 years; 1,792 women), 13%, 58%, and 29% had poor, intermediate, and ideal CVH, respectively. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that CVH was significantly associated with cognitive function only in women. A stratified analysis showed that cognitive impairment due to CVH was not associated with hs-CRP levels. When the same analyses were conducted for each CVH component, the only component affecting the association was hypertension history in men.
CONCLUSIONS:
CVH is not significantly associated with cognitive decline in the middle-aged Korean population. Inflammation did not play a significant modifying role in this relationship.

View More

Accepted Articles Most Cited
The role of vitamin D deficiency on the Covid-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies Mehmet Onur Kaya, Esra Pamukçu, Burkay Yakar Epidemiol Health. 2021;e2021074. Epidemiologic characteristics of early cases with 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) disease in Korea Moran Ki, Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020007. Cited By 105
Effectiveness of the movement control measures during the third wave of COVID-19 in Malaysia Ahmed Syahmi Syafiq Md Zamri, Sarbhan Singh, Sumarni Mohd Ghazali, Lai Chee Herng, Sarat Chandra Dass, Tahir Aris, Hishamshah Mohd Ibrahim, Balvinder Singh Gill Epidemiol Health. 2021;e2021073. Estimating the reproductive number and the outbreak size of COVID-19 in Korea Sunhwa Choi, Moran Ki Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020011. Cited By 84
Words are not just words: how the use of media language in the COVID-19 era affects public health Georgios P. Georgiou Epidemiol Health. 2021;e2021072. Mental health outcomes of quarantine and isolation for infection prevention: a systematic umbrella review of the global evidence Md Mahbub Hossain, Abida Sultana, Neetu Purohit Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020038. Cited By 73
Perspective of COVID-19 outbreak , herd immunity formation and future public health strategies Young Taek Kim, Yoon Hyung Park Epidemiol Health. 2021;e2021071. An interim review of the epidemiological characteristics of 2019 novel coronavirus Sukhyun Ryu, Byung Chul Chun, Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020006. Cited By 68
  • JCR IF
  • SCImago Journal & Country Rank
  • KCI
  • DOAJ
  • Similarity Check
  • Crossref Cited-by Linking

ABOUT
ARTICLE CATEGORY

Browse all articles >

BROWSE ARTICLES
FOR AUTHORS AND REVIEWERS
Editorial Office
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine
50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea
TEL: +82-2-745-0662   FAX: +82-2-764-8328    E-mail: office.epih@gmail.com

Copyright © 2021 by Korean Society of Epidemiology.

Developed in M2PI

Close layer
prev next